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As the need for talent is increasing, competition from the private sector is growing fiercer.

By Susan Fallon Brown
Byline Originally Posted on Government Executive
October 31, 2018 

Employers across the country are facing critical skills gaps, and the federal government is no exception.

Missions are evolving quickly and agencies need new talent to keep the nation safe and deliver critical services. We talk a lot about the tech talent gap and the need for more cyber pros and data scientists, but government also has needs in areas like public health and federal law enforcement. Unfortunately, as the need for specialized talent is increasing, the competition from the private sector for hiring that talent is growing fiercer.

It’s time for a reality check: Talented people have options. These highly sought-after pros are heavily pursued by the private sector. Agencies are typically competing against higher salaries, corporate recruiters with compelling advertising campaigns, and a faster hiring process.

According to the Office of Personnel Management, the average hiring time for federal personnel is 106 days. This time lag can perpetuate the lack of trust employees have in their HR team’s recruitment capabilities. The most recent Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey, released late last week, revealed that just 42 percent of federal employees felt their team had the ability to recruit people with the right skills. In addition, the time it takes to hire personnel—typically more than three months—causes federal agencies to lose out on viable candidates who cannot wait that long to take new job opportunities.

These are major workforce challenges that the current administration is trying to change. In the president’s management agenda, the Office of Management and Budget called on agencies to re-evaluate their current HR processes and technology in support of establishing the “workforce of the 21st century.”

In its 2019 budget proposal, the White House noted that “the private sector continually finds new ways to evolve human capital management programs to maximize the return from their most valuable asset: their people. The federal government should do no less.”

To evolve workforce strategies and remain competitive with the private sector, federal agencies need to overcome four common challenges in federal recruiting:

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By Steve Jordon, Executive Director, NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative, and Rick Ferry, Regional Program Manager, Virginia Values Veterans (V3) Program| July 2018
Original Article Posted on THE VOICE OF TECHNOLOGY 

Greater Washington, D.C. is the second largest region in the country for employers seeking IT workers 

As the demand for tech talent expands exponentially from entry level to senior management positions, organizations are becoming more creative in sourcing and retaining skilled talent through channels like internships, apprenticeships and engaging with high school STEM students. Now more than ever, companies are tapping into the pool of more than 300,000 Veterans transitioning out of the military every year to fill positions. With their strong leadership, communication and technical skills, Veterans are strong candidates for roles in the technology sector.

Since 2013, the NVTC Veterans Employment Initiative (VEI) has provided support to NVTC member companies in their efforts to recruit, hire, train and retain qualified Veteran and military spouse talent. At the same time, the VEI also connects Veterans and military spouses to employment and career mentoring opportunities in the region.

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By Aaron Boyd, Senior Editor | July 6, 2018
Original Article Posted on Nextgov

Here’s why public-sector hiring managers think the government is struggling to fill its ranks.

Government research group Market Connections and the government arm of job-search company Monster.com, Monster Government Solutions, polled 200 human resources professionals and hiring managers from the public sector (75 percent) and government contractors (25 percent) to get a ground-level view of current workforce challenges.

The majority of respondents (52 percent) agreed the dearth of qualified candidates is the biggest recruitment problem. Respondents also cited an inability to compete on salary (44 percent), long lead-times finding qualified candidates (42 percent) and budget restrictions (40 percent).

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By Jim Brock | July 2, 2018
Original Article Posted on The Business Journal 

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio – After a veteran has served his country, he might need a hand-up. Some veterans may be leaving the service without a job waiting for them, a stable place to live or some might require special resources.

Combat veterans, for instance, often need resources to help cope with the psychological and physical problems that many experience after being deployed.

There are many opportunities for local veterans with a variety of organizations that help with everything from employment to education. Sometimes they just need a listening ear from a fellow vet they may meet at any number of private organizations in the area such as the Veterans of Foreign Wars or the American Legion.

Whatever help veterans may require, there are plenty of resources throughout the area to satisfy their needs.

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MCLEAN, VA (June 27, 2018) - Study findings from a recent survey conducted by premier recruitment and workforce solution provider, Monster Government Solutions, and custom market research firm, Market Connections revealed a significant difference in how public sector versus private sector organizations use online tools to recruit talent. According to the study, private sector contractors are twice as likely as their public sector counterparts to leverage digital platforms and social channels for their recruitment needs.

The Government Recruitment & Retention Study surveyed 200 HR professionals within the public sector and the private sector government contracting community, on workforce challenges and opportunities in today’s competitive talent landscape.

Findings revealed that 52 percent of all respondents believe the shortage of available, qualified, and experienced job candidates remains the leading recruitment challenge. In addition, 39 percent of all respondents indicate they are dissatisfied with their current recruitment practices.

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